Radionuclides in pharmacology.
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Radionuclides in pharmacology.

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Published by Pergamon Press in Oxford, New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Radioisotopes in pharmacology.

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementContributors: L-E. Appelgren [and others. Section editor: Y. Cohen.
SeriesInternational encyclopedia of pharmacology and therapeutics,, section 78
ContributionsAppelgren, Lars-Erik., Cohen, Yves, 1927- ed.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRM858 .R33 1971
The Physical Object
Pagination2 v. (xviii, 962 p.)
Number of Pages962
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL4576625M
ISBN 100080161529
LC Control Number77133090

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Abstract. Stem cells are critical to maintaining steady-state organ homeostasis and regenerating injured tissues. Recent intriguing reports implicate extracellular vesicles (EVs) as carriers for the distribution of morphogens and growth and differentiation factors Cited by: @article{osti_, title = {Radionuclides in nephrology}, author = {Lausanne, A.B.D.}, abstractNote = {In 47 expert contributions, this volume provides a summary of the latest research on radionuclides in nephro-urology together with current and new clinical applications especially in renovascular hypertension, kidney transplantation, and metabolic and urological diseases. RADIOACTIVITY – RADIONUCLIDES – RADIATION is suitable for a general audience interested in topical environmental and human health radiological issues such as radiation exposure in aircraft, food sterilisation, nuclear medicine, radon gas, radiation dispersion devices ("dirty bombs") Cited by:   The potential use of radionuclides in therapy has been recognized for many decades. A number of radionuclides, such as iodine ( I), phosphorous (32 P), strontium (90 Sr), and yttrium (90 Y), have been used successfully for the treatment of many benign and malignant ly, the rapid growth of this branch of nuclear medicine has been stimulated by the Cited by:

A radionuclide (radioactive nuclide, radioisotope or radioactive isotope) is an atom that has excess nuclear energy, making it unstable. This excess energy can be used in one of three ways: emitted from the nucleus as gamma radiation; transferred to one of its electrons to release it as a conversion electron; or used to create and emit a new particle (alpha particle or beta particle) from the. This timely resource compares single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), used mainly with Technetium and iodine for routine clinical examinations, and positron emission tomography (PET), employing short-lived radionuclides of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and fluorine in research investigations. Presenting the logic behind why one approach is better than another in various circumstances 3/5(1). In Nuclear Medicine (Fourth Edition), Elements, Radionuclides, and Radiopharmaceuticals. Most radiopharmaceuticals are a combination of a radioactive molecule, a radionuclide, that permits external detection and a biologically active molecule or drug that acts . Buy Radiopharmaceuticals: Chemistry and Pharmacology (Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences Book 55): Read Kindle Store Reviews - ce: $

In Nuclear Medicine (Fourth Edition), Elements, Radionuclides, and Radiopharmaceuticals. Most radiopharmaceuticals are a combination of a radioactive molecule, a radionuclide, that permits external detection and a biologically active molecule or drug that acts as a carrier and determines localization and biodistribution. For a few radiotracers (e.g., radioiodine, gallium, and thallium. from book Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy (pp) Reactor-Produced Therapeutic Radionuclides. Chapter January Radiopharmaceuticals: Chemistry and Pharmacology - CRC Press Book This timely resource compares single-photon emission tomography (SPECT), used mainly withTechnetium and iodine for routine clinical examinations, and positron emission tomography(PET), employing short-lived radionuclides of carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, and fluorine in. Radiopharmacology is radiochemistry applied to medicine and thus the pharmacology of radiopharmaceuticals (medicinal radiocompounds, that is, pharmaceutical drugs that are radioactive).Radiopharmaceuticals are used in the field of nuclear medicine as radioactive tracers in medical imaging and in therapy for many diseases (for example, brachytherapy).Many Other names: Medicinal radiochemistry.